Energy

Energy

Serices

The energy portfolio covers renewable and non-renewable energy portfolio with support services ranging from scoping, prefeasibility and feasibility. Other support services linked to the energy portfolio include environmental management and other regulatory compliances. Our current focus with respect to energy is on wind and solar generation renewable energies. We are moving towards the extensive use of solar energy for all our commercial and residential development projects. One such application will be the use of solar energy for our proposed Mwale Mwiya Park development in Katima Mulilo, Namibia. Our support services covers permitting, general and specialist  projects planning, design, preconstruction, operations, HSE monitoring, closure/ upgrading, rehabilitation, restoration and aftercare.

Wind Energy in Namibia 

Virtually all wind turbines used today fit within two broad classes and these are Vertical and Horizontal Axis. Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) have advantages and disadvantages, but overall they have not been commercially successful like their cousins, the horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs). This is largely due to the poor performance and reliability of most VAWTs. However, there are practical applications for VAWTs and new research and technology is improving their performance. Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWTs), on the other hand, are very advanced, reliable, and economical. They come in many sizes and shapes, but they are all descendents of the old windmills used to grind grain or pump water. Today these machines are proven: they are used throughout the world producing clean, affordable, and sustainable electricity. Modern horizontal axis wind turbines produce electricity 70-85% of the time (whenever the wind is over 7-8 mph).

Wind turbines are classified by their size, or “capacity” (how much electricity they can produce). They can be Small (< 10 kW), Intermediate (10-500 kW), or Large (500 kW – 5 MW). Small wind turbines are used for homes, farms, and remote sites where electricity is hard to come by. They can be connected to the electric grid, but often they are just connected to a battery bank instead. Intermediate wind turbines are often used for schools or in hybrid systems with diesel generators used for powering remote towns and villages. Large or utility scale, wind turbines are used for producing electricity which goes onto the electric grid. Risk-Based Solution has been and continue to provide specialist permitting, general and technical support services to the following Wind Projects in Namibia:

  1. 8MW Wind Park to supply renewable energy to Namdeb, Elizabeth Bay Mine in the Sperrgebiet National Park, Lüderitz, //Karas, Namibia.
  2. Phased 150–500MW Wind Park project to supply renewable energy to the national and regional (SADC) grids situated near Elizabeth Bay Mine in the Sperrgebiet National Park, Lüderitz, //Karas, Namibia.
  3. 8MW Wind Park project to supply renewable electricity to the Lüderitz Town Council and project situated within the Lüderitz Townlands, Lüderitz, //Karas Region Namibia.

 

Solar Energy in Namibia

The term “photovoltaic” comes from the Greek Word meaning “light”, and the name of the Italian physicist Volta, after whom the volt (and consequently voltage) are named. It means literally of light and electricity. Photovoltaic cells convert light energy into electricity at the atomic level. Namibia has an annual average of 3 876 hours of sunshine and has the largest solar energy potential in the region. Namibia is one of the sunniest countries on Earth with a solar radiation of about 6 kWh per m² per day (100 x 60W light bulbs in 1 hour). Various smaller sizes to larger-scale 5MWPV installations continue to be installed all over the country. Risk-Based Solution has been and continue to provide specialist permitting, general and technical support services to the following grid-tie solar Projects in Namibia:

  1. Keetmanshoop 5 MWac Solar Parks
  2. Two Grootfontein 5 MWac each Solar
  3. Arandis3MWp Solar Park
  4. Otavi 5 MWac Solar Park
  5. Tsumeb 5 MWac Solar Park
  6. Otjiwarongo 5 MWac Solar Park
  7. Two (2) Omaruru Solar Parks of 5MWp each
  8. Osona 5MWp Solar Park